Mock Trial

 

If you are planning a career in the law, law enforcement, politics, or any other career requiring public speaking, consider joining our Mock Trial Team. But you don’t have to be focused on any of those careers to join us. We welcome all students from any major who are interested in learning critical thinking and presentation skills. Those students who only want to contribute as witnesses are welcome as well, and theater students often find Mock Trial an excellent addition to their major course work. 
What is Mock Trial?
Mock Trial is a simulated trial between two teams. The teams of 6-8 students represent either the prosecution in a criminal case (plaintiff, in a civil case) or the defense. An intercollegiate Mock Trial tournament consists of four rounds; each team represents both sides twice.  Each team is made up of three attorneys and three witnesses. One of the attorneys gives an opening statement, other attorneys question witnesses from both sides, and then a different attorney presents a closing argument. Real-life judges, attorneys, and law students judge the trials at invitational and regional AMTA tournaments.

Students planning a career in the law, law enforcement, politics or any other career requiring public speaking should consider joining Culver-Stockton's Mock Trial Team. But students don’t have to be focused on any of those careers to join the team. All students from any major who are interested in learning critical thinking and presentation skills are welcome. Those students who only want to contribute as witnesses are welcome as well, and theater students often find Mock Trial an excellent addition to their major course work. 


What is Mock Trial?

Mock Trial is a simulated trial between two teams. The teams of 6-8 students represent either the prosecution in a criminal case (plaintiff, in a civil case) or the defense. An intercollegiate Mock Trial tournament consists of four rounds; each team represents both sides twice.  Each team is made up of three attorneys and three witnesses. One of the attorneys gives an opening statement, other attorneys question witnesses from both sides, and then a different attorney presents a closing argument. Real-life judges, attorneys, and law students judge the trials at invitational and regional AMTA tournaments.